Ravenscroft, Titus Andronicus, or The Rape of Lavinia (Pages 10-11, 34-35)

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Dublin Core

Title

Ravenscroft, Titus Andronicus, or The Rape of Lavinia (Pages 10-11, 34-35)

Description

Page 10: Ravenscroft’s greater focus on Aaron the Moor reveals how compelling Shakespeare’s villain remained. Here, Tamora showily presents Aaron for Saturninus’s approval
Page 11: Aaron discusses the invisibility of his blushes. Later in the play, he will be made far more villainous than in Shakespeare, even eating his child in competition with Tamora for villainy. Ravenscroft seemingly cannot imagine the paternal protectiveness that is at the heart of Shakespeare’s characterization of Aaron.
Page 34-35: In Ravenscroft, Titus, rather than Lavinia, takes the lead in her revelation of her rapists and attackers.

Creator

Edward Ravenscroft

Source

The Huntington Library, San Marino, CA

Publisher

J.B[ennet]

Date

1687

Contributor

Printed for J. Hindmarsh, at the Golden-Ball in Cornhill, over against the Royal-Exchange

Rights

Public Domain Mark 1.0. Acknowledgement of The Huntington Library, San Marino, CA as a source is requested

Language

en

Coverage

London, England

Citation

Edward Ravenscroft, “Ravenscroft, Titus Andronicus, or The Rape of Lavinia (Pages 10-11, 34-35),” accessed April 14, 2024, https://timespencil.org/items/show/55.