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  • Tags: Cowden Clarke

Cowden Clarke, "Ophelia; The Rose of Elsinore," The Girlhood of Shakespeare's Heroines (Pages 196-197)

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Pages 196-197: Ophelia’s wet nurse’s troubled son frightens Ophelia with attention and cruelty. Note Cowden Clark’s interest in representing the boy’s violence toward flies in ways figured in other Shakespeare scenes, King Lear 4.1 and Titus…

Cowden Clarke, "Ophelia; The Rose of Elsinore," The Girlhood of Shakespeare's Heroines (Pages 236-237)

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Pages 236-237: Ophelia’s new friend at court, Thyra, reveals her attraction to and misunderstanding of the same lord who seduced and abandoned Jutha. Cowden Clark represents the unreliability and danger of male attention in Ophelia’s world.

Cowden Clarke, "Ophelia; The Rose of Elsinore," The Girlhood of Shakespeare's Heroines (Pages 216-217)

Ophelia, The Rose of Elsinore
Pages 216-217. These pages depict part of Jutha’s distressed behavior during her pregnancy by the lord who will abandon her. Jutha sings some of the sad and sexual songs Ophelia will later sing in Shakespeare’s play.